Recent Posts

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Fitness & Health Clubs Part 3 of 3

10/21/2020 (Permalink)

Lower risk Massachusetts communities have been permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan. The Commonwealth defines "Lower-risk communities"  as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reportsClick here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Fitness Centers And Health Clubs

The state of Massachusetts defines Fitness Centers and Health Clubs as any fitness facility that provides access to and/or instruction of personal fitness training, including but not limited to fitness activities such as:

  1. Weight and resistance training
  2. Crosstraining
  3. Yoga
  4. Spin classes
  5. Boot camp training

Indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, such as those for gymnastics, tennis, and swimming (whether a standalone facility or part of a Fitness Center or Health Club) must follow the Youth and Adult Sports guidance and the Pools guidance, available on the EEA Reopening Site.

Staffing And Operations Cont.

  1. Clearly designate staff responsible for sanitizing, cleaning, and supervision during each shift
  2. Workers must stay home if feeling ill
  3. If the employer is notified of a positive case at the workplace, the employer shall notify the local Board of Health (LBOH) in the city or town where the workplace is located and assist the LBOH as reasonably requested to advise likely contacts to isolate and self-quarantine. Testing of other workers may be recommended consistent with CDC or DPH guidance and / or at the request of the LBOH
  4. Post notice to workers and visitors of important health information and relevant safety measures as outlined in the Commonwealth’s Mandatory Safety Standards for Workplace
  5. Close or mark lockers to enforce 6 feet social distancing, especially in locker rooms. Lockers should be sanitized after each use. Gyms should provide sanitizing wipes near the lockers or in the locker room
  6. Individual and communal shower areas may open but should be limited to 50% capacity. Social distancing of at least 6 feet is required for all individuals in shower and locker room areas. Showers that accompany pools may follow guidance for pools located on the Reopening Website
  7. Require that towels be stored in clearly labeled (clean vs. soiled) sanitary containers. Appropriate temperatures should be used when washing and drying towels. Employees must wear proper protective equipment (gloves and face covering) while handling towels. Towels should not be shaken out
  8. Operations of related services may be allowed to open and must follow sector-specific safety protocols for each setting. Some examples include: 
    1. In-facility child-care: Must follow child-care guidance
    2. Bars/food services: Must follow restaurant guidance
    3. Pools: Must follow pool guidance 
    4. Athletic facilities (e.g., tennis courts): Must follow adult and youth sports guidance
    5. Massage: Must follow close contact personal services guidance
    6. Saunas, hot-tubs, and steam rooms: May not open before Phase 4
  9. Fans should not be used indoors and should only be used for outdoor classes if directed away from other customers
  10. For indoor and outdoor sports guidance, please refer to the EEA Reopening Site

Recommended Best Practices

  1. Consider creating “shifts” for customers engaging in unstructured exercise (i.e., open weight rooms) by using a reservation system in order to enforce occupancy limits
  2. Workers who are particularly high risk to COVID-19 according to the Centers for Disease Control (e.g., due to age or underlying conditions) are encouraged to stay home
  3. Encourage workers to self-identify symptoms or any close contact to a known or suspected COVID-19 case to the employer
  4. Encourage workers who test positive for COVID-19 to disclose to the workplace employer for purposes of cleaning / disinfecting and contact tracing
  5. Consider setting aside specific hours of operation exclusively for vulnerable populations
  6. Limit employees to discrete work zones to minimize overlap where possible

Cleaning And Disinfecting

  1. Clean commonly touched surfaces in restrooms (e.g., toilet seats, doorknobs, stall handles, sinks, paper towel dispensers, soap dispensers) frequently and in accordance with CDC guidelines
  2. Conduct frequent cleaning and disinfection of site (at least daily, and more frequently if feasible)
  3. Keep cleaning logs that include date, time, and scope of cleaning
  4. Conduct frequent disinfecting of heavily transited areas and high-touch surfaces (e.g., doorknobs, handrails, equipment, etc.)
  5. In the event of a positive case of a worker, customer or vendor shut down site and wait 24 hours before cleaning and disinfecting of the workplace in accordance with current CDC guidance
  6. Disinfect all fitness equipment or mutually-touched objects (e.g., spin shoes, jump ropes, dumbbells, etc.) immediately after each use. At no point should customers come in contact with objects that others have touched without first being disinfected according to CDC guidance

Recommended Best Practices

  • Open windows and doors to increase airflow where possible

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Fitness & Health Clubs Part 2 of 3

10/20/2020 (Permalink)

Lower risk Massachusetts communities have been permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan. The Commonwealth defines "Lower-risk communities"  as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reportsClick here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Fitness Centers And Health Clubs

The state of Massachusetts defines Fitness Centers and Health Clubs as any fitness facility that provides access to and/or instruction of personal fitness training, including but not limited to fitness activities such as:

  1. Weight and resistance training
  2. Crosstraining
  3. Yoga
  4. Spin classes
  5. Boot camp training

Indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, such as those for gymnastics, tennis, and swimming (whether a standalone facility or part of a Fitness Center or Health Club) must follow the Youth and Adult Sports guidance and the Pools guidance, available on the EEA Reopening Site.

Hygiene Protocols

  1. Ensure access to handwashing facilities on site, including soap and running water, and allow enough break time for workers to wash hands frequently; alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol may be used as an alternative
  2. Distribute hand sanitizer and disposable wipes abundantly throughout the space for workers and customers to disinfect their hands and equipment before and after use
  3. Place disposable wipes next to each piece of large equipment (such as treadmills, bikes, rowing machines) and next to each area containing smaller equipment (such as free weights)
  4. Require trainers to wash hands before and after each training session and sanitize frequently during each session
  5. All equipment must be sanitized between uses. No equipment shall be used by another customer or returned to the storage rack / container without being sanitized
  6. Encourage customers to use one piece of equipment at a time (e.g., limit circuit training or “super sets” with multiple pieces of equipment) in order to facilitate required sanitizing. Facilities must provide sanitization supplies at each piece of equipment in order for customers to clean in between each use
  7. If sanitation (or the monitoring thereof by employees) of any piece of equipment is not possible or practical, this equipment shall be closed off
  8. Encourage customers to use their own personal exercise equipment (such as spin shoes, jump ropes, yoga mats, etc.) when possible. If shared items are used, they must be sanitized in between each use
  9. Post visible signage throughout the site to remind workers and customers of hygiene and safety protocols
  10. Allow water fountains to be used as refill stations only, provided that social distancing can be maintained. Customers and workers should bring their own water bottles or purchase from the business. Customers are not to drink directly from the water fountain

Staffing Operations

  1. Encourage outdoor exercise, classes, sessions, etc. where possible, so long as appropriate physical distancing is maintained at all times and any equipment used is sanitized after each use
  2. Personal trainers should maintain six feet of distance from clients to the extent possible and should minimize any prolonged close contact. Personal trainers must wear face coverings. Any equipment used during the personal training session must be sanitized after each use, or at the end of the session if the client was the only person who used the equipment during the session
  3. Provide training to workers on up-to-date safety information and precautions including hygiene and other measures aimed at reducing disease transmission, including:
    1. Social distancing, hand-washing, proper use of face coverings
    2. Self-screening at home, including temperature and symptom checks
    3. Reinforcing that staff should not come to work if sick
    4. When to seek medical attention if symptoms become severe 
    5. Which underlying health conditions may make individuals more susceptible to contracting and suffering from a severe case of the virus
  4. Adjust workplace hours and shifts (working teams with different schedules or staggered arrival / departure) to minimize contact across workers and reduce congestion
  5. Require customers to sign up for classes in advance
  6. Facilities must screen workers at each shift by ensuring the following: 
    1. Worker is not experiencing any symptoms such as fever (100.0 and above) or chills, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, fatigue, headache, muscle/body aches, runny nose/congestion, new loss of taste or smell, or nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
    2. Worker has not had “close contact” with an individual diagnosed with COVID-19. “Close contact” means living in the same household as a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, caring for a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, being within 6 feet of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19 for 15 minutes or more, or coming in direct contact with secretions (e.g., sharing utensils, being coughed on) from a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, while that person was symptomatic
    3. Worker has not been asked to self-isolate or quarantine by their doctor or a local public health official
    4. Workers who fail to meet the above criteria must be sent home
  7. Maintain a log of workers and customers to support potential contact tracing (name, date, time, contact information)
  8. Close or limit waiting areas and, for class-based activities with distinct session times, ask customers to wait outside or in cars until 10 minutes prior to their class
  9. Schedule 30-minute windows between classes to allow for thorough cleaning and appropriate ventilation of the fitness room, and to discourage congestion

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Fitness & Health Clubs Part 1 of 3

10/16/2020 (Permalink)

Last Monday, October 5, lower risk Massachusetts communities will be permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan.

Lower-risk communities are defined as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reports. Click here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Fitness Centers And Health Clubs

The state of Massachusetts defines Fitness Centers and Health Clubs as any fitness facility that provides access to and/or instruction of personal fitness training, including but not limited to fitness activities such as:

  1. Weight and resistance training
  2. Crosstraining
  3. Yoga
  4. Spin classes
  5. Boot camp training

Indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, such as those for gymnastics, tennis, and swimming (whether a standalone facility or part of a Fitness Center or Health Club) must follow the Youth and Adult Sports guidance and the Pools guidance, available on the EEA Reopening Site.

Social Distancing And Capacity Limits

  1. Require face coverings for all workers and visitors, except where unsafe due to medical condition or disability, or when engaging in strenuous fitness activity in accordance with the rules below
  2. Customers wearing face coverings during fitness activity must maintain physical distancing of at least 6 feet. If customers cannot wear a face covering during strenuous fitness activity, distancing of at least 14 feet must be maintained,
  3. In Phase 3 Step 1, each facility must monitor visitor entries and exits, ensure social distancing, and limit occupancy at all times to:
    1. 40% of the facility’s maximum permitted occupancy as documented in its occupancy permit on record with the municipal building department or other municipal record holder
    2. Facilities for which no permitted occupancy limitation is on record may allow 8 persons per 1,000 square feet of accessible indoor or outdoor space
    3. In any case, no enclosed space within the facility shall exceed occupancy of 8 persons per 1,000 square feet
  4. In Phase 3 Step 2, each facility must monitor visitor entries and exits, ensure social distancing, and limit occupancy at all times to:
    1. 50% of the facility’s maximum permitted occupancy as documented in its occupancy permit on record with the municipal building department or other municipal record holder
    2. Facilities for which no permitted occupancy limitation is on record may allow up to 10 persons per 1,000 square feet of accessible indoor or outdoor space
    3. In any case, no enclosed space within the facility shall exceed occupancy of 10 persons per 1,000 square feet
  5. All occupancy counts and calculations shall include visitors, staff, and other workers
  6. Arrange all equipment (weights, machines, treadmills, bikes, etc.) so exercise areas are spaced out at least 14 feet apart. If spacing of equipment is not possible, equipment must be blocked off or closed to maintain 14 feet of distancing. Spacing of machines may be adjusted to at least 6 feet apart if barriers are installed
  7. Consider installing plastic barriers between equipment where possible. Barriers must extend high enough to effectively block respiration from someone using the equipment. If barriers are installed, they must be cleaned regularly.
  8. In group fitness classes, 14 feet of physical distancing must be maintained between attendees at all times. If physical barriers are installed to separate group fitness equipment, 6 feet of physical distancing must be maintained
  9. Install visual markers (boundaries, walkways, signage, etc.) to encourage customers to remain at least 6 feet apart while moving throughout the space
  10. Establish directional pathways to manage visitor flow for foot traffic, to minimize contact (e.g., one-way entrance and exit to rooms, oneway pathways). Post clearly visible signage regarding these policies
  11. Stagger lunch and break times for workers, regulate the maximum number of people in one place and ensure at least 6 feet of physical distancing between workers
  12. Close or reconfigure common spaces and high-density areas of facilities where workers are likely to congregate (e.g., break rooms and eating areas) to allow 6 feet of physical distancing
  13. Close or reconfigure other common spaces where customers are likely to congregate or where social distancing is not possible, such as lobbies and waiting areas
  14. Install physical partitions in areas where physical distancing is not possible, such as service counters

Recommended Best Practices

  1. Consider installing plastic barriers between equipment where possible. Barriers must extend high enough to effectively block respiration from someone using the equipment. If barriers are installed, they must be cleaned regularly
  2. Consider establishing “workout zones” to encourage spacing of customers using free weights, dumbbells, etc.
  3. Contactless payment and sign-in methods are encouraged

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!

3 Ways To Minimize Mold Growth In Bathrooms

10/15/2020 (Permalink)

Whether you are a commercial or residential property owner, moldy bathrooms can be problematic. Experiencing mold growth in your bathroom can be a cause for concern. Just because there are no leaks, mold growth can still occur. Why? Poor ventilation, grout in need of repair and accessories can all can all create an environment conducive

Here are three useful measures you can take to eradicate any growth for good and ensure proper mold prevention in your bathroom for years to come.

Ventilation

Install a proper ventilation system. When it comes to keeping moisture at bay, a high-powered ventilation system is key. Exhaust fans should not only be on during a shower, but be kept on for close to 20-30 minutes after a shower as a method of keeping constant air flow throughout the space. This can help enforce a moisture-free environment in areas where high humidity are common occurrences.

Grout

Keep a close eye on tile grout and caulking. Grout between your shower tiles, especially if it’s cracked in places, makes for great breeding ground for mold. Therefore, it pays to clean your grout on a weekly basis to hinder any mold growth. Furthermore, replace it every 6 months and seal it well to effectively ward off its potential spread. If you’ve noticed water damage and mold as a result of cracked grout or degraded caulking, contacting a highly-qualified mold remediation team could be crucial for eliminating any greater problem areas.

Bathroom Accessories

Focus on your shower curtains, towels, rugs and any cloth decor. Fibrous towels and rugs come into direct contact with water on a daily basis and should therefore be washed consistently. Shower curtains made of cloth should be washed in hot water or replaced by plastic varieties that can easily be wiped down and cleaned.

Mold occurs naturally in all environments. While it is possible to minimize the risk, preventative measures will not guarantee a mold free space. If you suspect the presents of mold in your house please give our expects a call at SERVPRO of Foxborough at (508) 533-5305. We will assess your situation and if need be, make it "Like it never even happened."

Certified Technicians

10/15/2020 (Permalink)

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are trained and certified. What does that mean? 

IICRC

Restoration industry standards are set by the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification Board (IICRC). It is a non-profit group overseeing the qualification of the restoration, remediation and cleaning trade. When a technician obtains a program mitigation certificate from the IICRC, he or she is held to the highest standards. Not only does this keep industry standards high, but it also establishes a recognized national standard, and that is why insurance agents and adjusters keep the graduates on their preferred vendor's lists. Here are a few of the values our certified technicians are expected to uphold.

Respect

Technicians are taught that working with clients and staff that everyone treats respectfully can elevate the job site. It can also help bring out natural abilities and let inborn qualities shine.

Integrity

Valuing integrity, the expectation is that all graduating technicians will have strong ethical principles. Dealing honestly and upholding high values is important in developing an honorable reputation within the cleaning and restoration industry.

Responsibility

Once at a job, all IICRC certified technicians are expected to work as if the property were their own. This includes completing the job promptly and using the best tools available to finish the job.

Excellence

Service, leadership, and duty are all part of what the graduate is expected to bring to the office each day. Our technicians are also taught to hold high standards in service, on the job and off.

Expertise

To keep standards, values, and expertise high, the board continues to hold classes to improve industry knowledge. As new and improved tools become available, they are incorporated into the classes. Also, certification is a lifelong process of self-improvement and gaining professional knowledge. Our technicians must obtain 14 hours of education every four years.

The IICRC helps hold trained technicians of the cleaning and restoration industry to a high standard. At SERVPRO of Foxborough we value and understand the importance of certification. That is why our technicians are certified, and that is the SERVPRO Difference.

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Close Contact Personal Services Part 3 of 3

10/15/2020 (Permalink)

Last Monday, October 5, lower risk Massachusetts communities will be permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan.

Lower-risk communities are defined as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reports. Click here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Close Contact Personal Services - Cleaning And Disinfecting

  1. Establish and maintain cleaning protocols specific to the business
  2. When an active employee is diagnosed with COVID19, cleaning and disinfecting must be performed
  3. Disinfection of all common surfaces must take place at intervals appropriate to said workplace
  4. Clean commonly touched surfaces in restrooms (e.g., toilet seats, doorknobs, stall handles, sinks, paper towel dispensers, soap dispensers) frequently and in accordance with CDC guidelines
  5. Conduct frequent cleaning and disinfection of site (at least daily, and more frequently if feasible)
  6. Keep cleaning logs that include date, time, and scope of cleaning
  7. Conduct frequent disinfecting of heavily transited areas and high-touch surfaces (e.g., doorknobs, handrails, headrests, armrests, etc.)
  8. In the event of a positive case of a worker, patron or vendor shut down site for a deep cleaning and disinfecting of the workplace in accordance with current CDC guidance
  9. Disinfect or replace tools, implements and surfaces between customers (e.g., tables, finger bowls, chairs and headrests, spatulas, clippers, spacers, styling tools)
  10. If tools cannot be disinfected (i.e., porous tools such as nail files, buffers, drill bits, etc.), they must be discarded after use
  11. Disinfect chair, table, and/or workstation between customers or use disposable plastic coverings for each customer, observing contact time on label for disinfectant to work properly
  12. Launder all linens, towel drapes and smocks in hot soapy water and dry completely regularly and between each use
  13. Routine cleaning and disinfection procedures (e.g., using cleaners and water to pre-clean surfaces prior to applying an EPA-registered, hospital-grade disinfectant for appropriate contact times as indicated on the product's label).
  14. If performing emergency dental procedures, follow standard practices for disinfection and sterilization of dental devices contaminated with SARS-CoV-2, as described in the CDC Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, 2008 and Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health Care Settings – 2003.
  15. In some emergency procedures appropriate cleaning and disinfecting techniques from bloodborne pathogen practices should be used, including protecting vacuum lines with liquid disinfectant traps and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters or filters of equivalent or superior efficiency and which are checked routinely and maintained or replaced as necessary.

Note: Workers who perform cleaning and disinfection in healthcare may require PPE and/or other controls to protect them simultaneously from chemical hazards posed by disinfectants and from human blood, body fluids, and other potentially infectious materials to which they have occupational exposure in the healthcare environment. Employers may need to adapt guidance from this Dentistry workers and Employers section, the Environmental Services Workers and Employers section, and the interim guidance for workers and employers of workers at increased risk of occupational exposure, in order to fully protect workers performing cleaning and disinfection activities in healthcare workplaces.

Recommended Best Practices

  • Open windows and doors to increase airflow where possible

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!

Properly Clean Soot Damage

10/14/2020 (Permalink)

Damage from a fire can be traumatic. Removing damaged or ruined items is just the beginning of the restoration process. Improperly cleaning soot and smoke residue can result in more damage to your Walpole, MA residential or commercial property. The best course of action, call the experts. 

The Disaster Remediation teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough have considerable training in identifying different kinds of residues and odor particles, which helps them pinpoint the ideal cleanup procedures for your fire damaged home.

What Is Soot

Soot is a smoke that has settled on surfaces as a residue. There are four different kinds of smoke residue: 

  • Dry smoke residues
  • Wet smoke residues
  • Protein smoke residues
  • Fuel oil smoke residues 

Each Type Of Residue Must Be Cleaned Differently 

All fires burn differently, which means they leave behind different kinds of residues. Many variables determine what kinds of residues are left behind. Still, SERVPRO of Foxborough  technicians have the experience to outline the best cleanup process, and they know which products are necessary to eliminate the specific residues. 

How To Approach Cleanup

  • Find and identify the residues
  • Identify the surfaces on which residues are present
  • Capture and remove the residues
  • Properly dispose of the residues 

Cleaning Techniques 

We use both air and fluids to remove residues, depending on the residue types and where they are present. Our Disaster Remediation Teams may use vacuuming to remove some residues, while others are captured and dissolved in different cleaning solutions. They also understand how to remove these residues after completing the cleanup process. 

Has your residential or commercial property suffered fire damage? Call the experts at SERVPRO of Foxborough today – (508) 533-5305. We will make it “Like it never even happened.”

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Close Contact Personal Services Part 2 of 3

10/14/2020 (Permalink)

Last Monday, October 5, lower risk Massachusetts communities will be permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan.

Lower-risk communities are defined as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reports. Click here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Close Contact Personal Services - Hygiene Protocols

  1. Ensure access to handwashing facilities on site, including soap and running water, and allow enough break time for workers to wash hands frequently; alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol may be used as an alternative
  2. Supply workers at workplace location with adequate cleaning products (e.g., sanitizer, disinfecting wipes, disinfectant)
  3. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol shall be made available at entrances and throughout floor areas for both workers and customers
  4. Require glove changes and handwashing before and after each customer
  5. Do not permit sharing of tools and supplies between workers (e.g., clippers, spacers, brushes, needles, etc.). All tools must be cleaned between each customer
  6. Workers should change into a clean smock or gown between each customer. Consider using disposable capes and smocks. Reusable capes, towels, gowns should be laundered between each use
  7. Post visible signage throughout the site to remind workers and customers of hygiene and safety protocols

Staffing & Operations

  1. Provide training to workers on up-to-date safety information and precautions including hygiene and other measures aimed at reducing disease transmission, including:
    1. Social distancing, hand-washing, proper use of face coverings
    2. Self-screening at home, including temperature and symptom checks 
    3. Reinforcing that staff shall not come to work if sick 
    4. When to seek medical attention if symptoms become severe 
    5. Which underlying health conditions may make individuals more susceptible to contracting and suffering from a severe case of the virus
  2. Facilities must screen workers at each shift by ensuring the following:
    1. Worker is not experiencing any symptoms such as fever (100.0 and above) or chills, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, fatigue, headache, muscle/body aches, runny nose/congestion, new loss of taste or smell, or nausea, vomiting or diarrhea 
    2. Worker has not had “close contact” with an individual diagnosed with COVID-19. “Close contact” means living in the same household as a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, caring for a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, being within 6 feet of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19 for 15 minutes or more, or coming in direct contact with secretions (e.g., sharing utensils, being coughed on) from a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    3. Worker has not been asked to self-isolate or quarantine by their doctor or a local public health official
    4. Workers who fail to meet the above criteria must be sent home
  3. Adjust workplace hours and shifts (working teams with different schedules or staggered arrival / departure) to minimize contact across workers and reduce congestion
  4. Require customers to make an appointment in advance to receive service
  5. Close waiting areas and ask customers to wait outside or in cars until it is time for their appointment
  6. Maintain a log of workers and customers to support potential contact tracing (name, date, time, contact information)
  7. Remove non-essential amenities (e.g., magazines, customer-facing water or coffee, coat rooms, etc.)
  8. Workers shall not appear for work or complete a shift if feeling ill
  9. Encourage workers who test positive for COVID-19 to disclose to the workplace employer for purposes of cleaning / disinfecting and contact tracing. If the employer is notified of any positive case at the workplace, the employer must immediately notify the local Board of Health (LBOH) in the city or town where the workplace is located. Employers must assist the LBOH with contact tracing efforts, including advising likely contacts to isolate and self-quarantine. Testing of other workers may be recommended consistent with guidance and / or at the request of the LBOH
  10. Post notice to workers and customers of important health information and relevant safety measures as outlined in the Commonwealth’s Mandatory Safety Standards for Workplace
  11. Businesses should maintain operating hours that allow for on-going off-hour sanitation and cleaning
  12. Limit visitors and service providers on site; shipping and deliveries should be completed in designated areas

Recommended Best Practices

  1. Workers who are who are at high risk from COVID-19 according to the Centers for Disease Control should be encouraged to stay home or should have work assignments shifted to reduce contact with customers and co-workers
  2. Workers are strongly encouraged to self-identify symptoms or any close contact to a known or suspected COVID-19 case to the employer
  3. Encourage workers who test positive for COVID-19 to disclose to the workplace employer for purposes of cleaning / disinfecting and contact tracing
  4. Limit employee movement to discrete work zones to minimize overlap where possible

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!

Even Small Leaks Can Lead To Large Losses

10/13/2020 (Permalink)

Even the smallest spills and leaks can lead to major damage in your Foxborough, MA residential or commercial property. Not properly cleaning up after a spill can cause mold growth. Ignoring a small water leak can, over time, can cause damage to building materials such as floors, walls, insulation and may even result in structural damage. 

Not every water spill is serious enough to call a professional water cleanup company, but it's important for you to know how to properly take care of any spills or small leak. If you act fast and understand how to clean up, you can prevent any secondary damage. 

For example, a fish tank that leaks or breaks and a gallons of water spill onto the floor. Here are some of the things you'll need to properly clean the area:

  1. Shop vacuum (wet/dry vac) 
  2. Pumps
  3. Towels
  4. Box fan/s 
  5. Air movers
  6. Dehumidifier - If you don't have one you can rent from your local tool rental business. It's best to have an industrial strength dehumidifier, but in a pinch a household is better than no dehumidifier at all.

Most property owners may have some of the necessary tools and may even think that is enough. Unfortunately, that is usually not the case. There are no short cuts to take during the drying process.

As soon as you see the spill, and IF IT IS SAFE TO DO SO:

  1. Identify and stop the source of water
  2. Cleaning up the mess right away with a a pump or shop vacuum if you have one
  3. Use towels to dry the rest of the water
  4. ONLY IF ALL WATER HAS BEEN REMOVED AND IT IS SAFE TO DO SO, place box fans or a dehumidifiers near the damaged area and them on.    

The fact is that it is NOT always safe to clean up water damage. From contaminated water to the possibility of electrocution the risk of harming oneself is real. That is why you need the help of certified professionals.

If water has damaged your commercial or residential property call the experts at SERVPRO of FoxboroughWe will make it "Like it never even happened," at (508) 229-2061 for remediation services. 

Planning To Reopen - Updated MA Safety, Close Contact Personal Services Part 1 of 3

10/13/2020 (Permalink)

Last Monday, October 5, lower risk Massachusetts communities will be permitted to move into Step II of Phase III of Governor Baker's reopening plan.

Lower-risk communities are defined as cities and towns that have not been designated in the “red” category in any of the last three weekly Department of Public Health weekly reports. Click here to see the list of communities not designated as lower-risk communities.

To assist business owners we will be sharing highlights of the State's Updated Safety Standards and Reopening Guidelines for impacted sectors.  

NOTE: COVID-19 is highly transmissible. Individuals should follow these universal precautions regardless of the extent of mitigation needed:

  1. Follow healthy hygiene practices
  2. Stay at home when sick
  3. Practice social distancing 
  4. Use a cloth face covering (with some exceptions) in community settings when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

The current state of the COVID-19 pandemic is continually evolving. What is true today may not be tomorrow. At this time, the evidence suggests schools have not played a significant role in COVID-19 transmission and that children, particularly younger children, are less likely than adults to be infected with COVID-19.

As always, work with your local health officials to determine a set of strategies appropriate for your community’s situation.

(See our Planning to Reopen series of blogs for more information regarding CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass DESE, and OSHA safety requirements). To review the administration's reopening guidance from the state click here. To view Governor Baker's full report click here).

Close Contact Personal Services 

This is a reminder that Barber Shops and Hair Salons, originally authorized to open in Phase 1 of the Re-Opening Plan, are subject to these workplace safety standards.

Close Contact Personal Service are defined as any personal service typically delivered through close physical contact with the customer, including but not limited to:

  • hair salons and barber shops; as permitted to open in Phase 1 of the Re-Opening Plan
  • hair removal services; including laser services, depilatory salons, waxing services, threading, and electrolysis services 
  • massage, body treatments, eastern treatment, energy therapies and other body work therapies
  • skin care services; including peels, facials, serums, Botox and filler
  • nail care services; including nail salons
  • other hair services; including hair replacement services, scalp treating services 
  • makeup salons
  • makeup application services;
  • tanning salons; including other businesses that provide spray tanning and tanning beds; and
  • tattoo, piercing, and body art services

Note: personal trainers should follow fitness center and health club guidance for Phase 3, available on the Massachusetts Reopening Site Saunas, hot tubs, and sensory float tanks must remain closed

MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS SOCIAL DISTANCING & CAPACITY LIMIT

Face coverings are required for all customers and workers, except where an individual is unable to wear a face covering due to a medical condition or disability

  • For skin or beard care that occurs on the face, the customer may temporarily remove the face covering but must immediately put the face covering back on for the remainder of the visit. Require workers to wear gloves, gowns or smocks, and prescription glasses, safety glasses or goggles Ensure separation of 6 feet or more between individuals where possible:
  • Close or reconfigure common spaces and high density areas where workers and patrons are likely to congregate (e.g., break rooms and eating areas for workers; lobbies and workstations for customers) to allow social distancing 
  • Arrange workstations so work areas are spaced out at least 6 feet apart
  • Physical partitions must separate workstations that cannot be spaced out (partitions must be at least 6 feet in height)
  • Install physical barriers for checkout stations where possible, otherwise maintain 6 feet distance where not possible
  • Install visual social distancing markers to encourage customers to remain 6 feet apart (e.g., checkout lines, lines to use the restroom)
  • Mark rooms and hallways to indicate 6 feet separation Stagger lunch and break times for workers, regulate the maximum number of people in one place, and ensure at least 6 feet of physical distancing Establish directional pathways to manage visitor flow for foot traffic, to minimize contact (e.g., one-way entrance and exit to rooms, one-way pathways). Post clearly visible signage regarding these policies No guests should accompany the customer during the personal service except for persons serving as caretakers or guardians. Guests must observe all other requirements of customers, including wearing a face covering and maintaining 6 feet of separation from other persons present

Recommended Best Practices

Contactless payment methods are encouraged Encourage curbside pickup or delivery of any retail items purchased by customers not already on the premises for a service appointment, and follow the Retail Business guidance for customers seeking retail purchases instead of or in addition to personal services

While the administration continues to work with communities to implement best practices and protocols for reopening our schools we will continue to share with you guidance from the CDCEPAFDAMass EEAMass EECMass DESE, and OSHA and the Governor's office to follow as we prepare for the new school year.

Also, we at SERVPRO of Foxborough know that not every community has access to the resources necessary to meet the strict cleaning guidelines to ensure a safe environment for our children. For those communities, we are here to help!

Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

The Disaster Remediation Teams at SERVPRO of Foxborough are specialists in cleaning services and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards. We are prepared to clean and disinfect your schools, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work of "normal daily cleaning". Call SERVPRO of Foxborough today for a free consultation - (508) 533-5305.

All of us here at SERVPRO of Foxborough want you and your loved ones to stay safe and know that we will make it through this together! Rest assured, we will continue to do our best to keep you up-to-date and informed!